Julie 101

Julie 101: Blogging, cooking, servicing, healthifying, growing, financializing, organizing, designing, exploring, primping and playing!

A Thumb of a Different Color

So this spring/summer, I finally had my own vegetable garden. I worked really hard at remembering to water and take care of the plants, and turned my previously black thumb a wonderful green! Here’s how it all came together…

20120726-120422.jpg

Started off from seed – ambitious, but it was fun seeing the seedlings starting as early as April!

20120726-120443.jpg

The first emergence of lettuce….

20120726-120506.jpg

20120726-120521.jpg

The soil in my backyard is not really soil – more of a clay/rock mixture, so needless to say not conducive to hearty veggie plants! Dad came over to build me a raised bed. Love him!

20120726-120531.jpg

The finished raised bed, sans dirt

20120726-120545.jpg

Dirt added ($80 worth of it..ugh.) and seedlings moved in! Blueberry bush, tomatoes, peppers, zucchini, cucumbers, broccoli and lettuce.

20120726-120602.jpg

20120726-120611.jpg

20120726-120634.jpg

20121102-125748.jpg

Delicious tomatoes!

I will so be doing this again next year. Some things I learned:

1. When planting from seed, only plant a couple seeds per pot, and thin them out as they grow. I ended up not having any lettuce, the broccoli …. I”m not sure what happened but it didn’t grow right, and the cucumbers/zucchinis were very small. I think they were crowded by having too many plants in one concentrated area.

2. Consistent watering and fertilizing! I had a ton of tomatoes, but a lot of them suffered from blossom rot (black spots on the pretty fruit 😦 ). This could happen from inconsistent watering (I admit, I spent more time at the Boyf’s than my house this summer) or not enough nutrients in the soil. Lesson learned!

3. Pay attention to the schedule on the seed packets. I don’t think all those vegetables were supposed to be planted/growing at the same time (lettuce vs. peppers, it seems, would be early spring vs. late summer). I was so excited to have tons of veggies that I didn’t pay much attention to this step. I’ll do my research well over the winter!

4. Use what you have instead of buying tons of gardening supplies. I am now stocked up on tons of different sizes of pots, from starting from seed and transplanting to bigger and bigger pots prior to planting outside. But I could have saved a ton of money on the peat pots by planting in lemon rinds or homemade newspaper pots. I also now have tomato stakes so I won’t have to buy that next year. I’m also taking a composting class next week at the Pennsylvania Resource Council (they’ll give me my own Earth Machine compost bin) so that I’ll be able to use my kitchen scraps over the winter to supplement the dirt I already have in the raised bed next spring.

I can’t wait to do this again next summer, it was so gratifying to see everything grow from seed to plant to veggie! I’m also going to try my hand at spring flowers around the front garden bed and backyard, but that might be baby steps.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on November 6, 2012 by in 101 in 1001, Life and tagged , , , .

Julie101: Stats

  • 7,818 hits

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 448 other followers

%d bloggers like this: